Massage Therapy

Massage Therapy

Massage Therapy

For Acute and Chronic Pain

Massage is a popular therapy used to relieve muscle tension, spasms, inflammation, fluid retention, aches, stiffness, and pain. Other benefits include improved circulation (blood and lymph), general flexibility, range of motion, and increased tissue elasticity (e.g. scar tissue). During treatment, the massage therapist will include localized massage (e.g. low back or neck) as a prelude to exercise. Massage increases circulation and warms muscles and other soft tissues (e.g. tendons, ligaments).

What to Expect

During your massage it is important to communicate with the therapist whether the pressure is too light or too gentle. After your massage make sure that you drink plenty of water to help your body flush out any waste products that were in the muscles that have now been released.

Massage is a popular therapy used to relieve muscle tension, spasms, inflammation, fluid retention, aches, stiffness, and pain. Other benefits include improved circulation (blood and lymph), general flexibility, range of motion, and increased tissue elasticity (e.g. scar tissue). During treatment, the massage therapist will include localized massage (e.g. low back or neck) as a prelude to exercise. Massage increases circulation and warms muscles and other soft tissues (e.g. tendons, ligaments).

As the therapist uses their hands or specialized tools to rhythmically knead, rub, and stroke (effluerage) muscles, circulation is stimulated. Blood flow delivers oxygen and nutrients, and is key to helping muscles eliminate waste products, such as lactic acid, that may collect in muscles from spasms causing pain. Following trauma, muscles may act as mini-splints to protect and limit motion, similar to a cast on a broken arm. A typical example is a person who uses a computer for a prolonged time period without taking a break to stretch the neck. The result: stiff neck, aching, even pain.

This technique is a very specialized form of manual therapy. A therapist trained in NMT is educated in the physiology of the nervous system and its effect on the muscular and skeletal systems. Neuromuscular Therapy is the utilization of static pressure on specific myofascial points to relieve pain. This technique manipulates the soft tissue of the body (muscles, tendons and connective tissue) to balance the central nervous system. In a healthy individual, nerves transmit impulses (which are responsible for every movement, function and thought) to the body very slowly. Injury, trauma, postural distortion or stress cause nerves to speed up their transmission, inhibiting equilibrium and making the body vulnerable to pain and dysfunction. It is therefore necessary to stabilize low levels of neurological activity to maintain normal function and overall health.

This technique targets chronic muscle tension. The therapist’s strokes are slower, using more direct pressure and friction. Depending on the texture of the deeper layers of muscle and tissue felt, the therapist periodically adjusts their hand positions, strokes, and intensity to work the tissues to release tension.

Myofascial release, or soft tissue mobilization, is a therapy used to release tension stored in the fascia. Fascia are sheets of fibrous tissue that encase and support muscles, separating them into groups and layers. Following trauma, the fascia and muscles may shorten restricting blood flow. The techniques used in myofascial release relax muscle tension and break up fascial adhesions.

Trigger points are tiny, tight nodules that form in muscles causing referred pain. Sometimes myofascial pain can be linked to one or more trigger points. The treatment goals include alleviating muscle spasms, improving circulation, and releasing trigger points. The therapist applies direct momentary pressure to a trigger point to cause its release. During the massage, the therapist may return several times to a stubborn trigger point to elicit its release. As trigger points are released, the therapist stretches the muscle using a technique called Spray and Stretch. This technique incorporates a superficial cooling agent such as Fluori-Methane, a local anesthetic that depresses nerve response. The anesthetic is sprayed over muscles as they are gently stretched, soothing tight muscles.

Hours

Monday

8:30AM – 12:00PM &
2:00PM – 6:00PM


Tuesday - Thursday

8:30AM – 12:00PM &
1:00PM – 6:00PM


Friday, Saturday & Sunday

Closed

Locations

Murray

32 West 6400 South
(Winchester St.) Ste. 200
Murray, Utah 84107

Get Directions

Phone

(801) 466-7246

Fax

(801) 327-9339

Taylorsville

1972 West 5400 South
Taylorsville, Utah 84129

Get Directions

Phone

(801) 878-7880

Fax

(801) 849-0340